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National Program Standards

Crosswalk Tool

About the Standards

The ECQA Center appreciates the collaboration and cooperation of the agencies and organizations listed below. They reviewed the crosswalk, provided comments, and helped ensure that the tool is accurate and reflects the full content of their standards. This tool was built upon the work of several States that had developed crosswalk tools including Colorado, New York, and Texas. The ECQA Center is also grateful for the Texas Early Learning Council that shared their work to develop a standards crosswalk. Originally developed by the National Center on Child Care Quality Improvement under contract with the Office of Child Care, it is now being maintained by NCECQA.

This tool was originally developed with funds from Contract # HHSP23320110019YC and modified with funds from Grant # 90TA0002-01-00 for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start, Office of Child Care, and Health Resources and Services Administration, by the National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance.

Federal Standards

Child Care and Development Fund, Office of Child Care, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

The Child Care and Development Fund Program (CCDF) is a federal and state partnership program (over $5 billion in federal funding) authorized under the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act (CCDBG) and administered by States, Territories, And Tribes with funding and support from the Administration for Children and Families’ Office of Child Care. States use CCDF to provide financial assistance to low-income families to access child care so they can work or attend a job training or educational program. In addition, states use the CCDF to invest in quality to benefit millions more children by building the skills and qualifications of the teacher workforce, supporting child care programs to achieve higher standards, and providing consumer education to help parents select child care that meets their families’ needs. Additional information about CCDF is available at https://www.acf.hhs.gov/occ.

Standards Used

45 CFR Part 98, Child Care and Development Fund Program, (September 20, 2016), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Child Care. https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-09-30/pdf/2016-22986.pdf

Note that the standards from the CCDF Final Rule included in the National Program Standards Crosswalk Tool are only the requirements that child care providers must comply with to receive CCDF funding. The many requirements about administration of the CCDF program that CCDF Lead Agencies must comply with are not included in the tool.

Head Start/Early Head Start, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Head Start/Early Head Start is a federal program that promotes the school readiness of children ages birth to five from low-income families by enhancing their cognitive, social, and emotional development. The Office of Head Start (OHS), within the Administration of Children and Families of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, awards grants to public and private agencies on a competitive basis to provide these comprehensive services to specific communities. Head Start/Early Head Start grantees provide the services as described in the Head Start Performance Standards and in accordance with the Head Start Act of 2007. Additional information about Head Start is available at http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc or 866-763-6481.

Standards Used

45 CFR Chapter, XIII Head Start Program Performance Standards, (September 6, 2016), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Head Start. http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc/standards/hspps

Public Law 110-134: Improving Head Start for School Readiness Act of 2007 (December 12, 2007), 110th Congress. http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/policy/head-start-act

DoD Child Development Programs, U.S. Department of Defense

The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) provides child care services for children, aged birth through 12 years, of DoD personnel provided in child development facilities that include child care centers, family child care homes, and alternative locations. Care may be provided on a full-day, part-day, or hourly basis. Care is designed to protect the health and safety of children and to promote their physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development and to enhance children's readiness for later school experience. All DoD Child Development Programs are required to meet the minimum operation standards of the Department of Defense Instruction 6060.02. In addition, each service branch of the military has its own set of requirements development programs. They vary widely and build the on requirements set in DoD Instruction 6060.02. Community-based child care programs serving military families are evaluated and approved with the Effectiveness Rating and Improvement System (ERIS), a detailed assessment tool developed by the DoD to evaluate facility-based child care providers.

Standards Used

Department of Defense Instruction 6060.02 – Child Development Programs (August 5, 2014), U.S. Department of Defense. http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/corres/pdf/606002p.pdf

National Health and Safety Standards

Caring for Our Children (CFOC) and Stepping Stones to Caring for Our Children (SS), American Academy of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association, and National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education

Caring for Our Children is a comprehensive compilation of health and safety standards related to all aspects of child care and early education, including staffing, health promotion and protection, nutrition, facilities, and special needs. These standards address the health and safety needs of children from birth to 12 years in family and group child care homes and child care centers. Additional information about CFOC is available at http://cfoc.nrckids.org/ or 800-598-KIDS(5437).

Stepping Stones is the collection of selected CFOC standards which, when put into practice, are most likely to prevent serious adverse outcomes, i.e., frequent or severe disease or injury, disability or death, to children in child care and early education settings. From the 686 standards in CFOC, 138 of them were selected for inclusion in CFOC-SS. Additional information about Stepping Stones is available at http://nrckids.org/index.cfm/products/stepping-stones-to-caring-for-our-children-3rd-edition-ss3/.

Standards Used

Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards; Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, 3rd Edition (2011), by the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association, and National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education. (CFOC) http://cfoc.nrckids.org/

Stepping Stones to Caring for Our Children: National Health and Safety Performance Standards; Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs, Third Edition (2013), by the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Public Health Association, and National Resource Center for Health and Safety in Child Care and Early Education. (CFOC-SS) http://nrckids.org/index.cfm/products/stepping-stones-to-caring-for-our-children-3rd-edition-ss3/

Caring for Our Children Basics: Health and Safety Foundations for Early Care and Education, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Caring for Our Children Basics represents the minimum health and safety standards experts believe should be in place where children are cared for outside of their homes. Caring for Our Children Basics is a helpful resource for States and other entities as they work to improve health and safety standards in licensing and quality rating improvement systems. For more information, please contact cfocbasics@acf.hhs.gov.

Standards Used

Caring for Our Children Basics: Health and Safety Foundations for Early Care and Education (2015), by the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (CFOCB) http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/ecd/caring-for-our-children-basics.

Accreditation Standards

NAEYC Academy Early Childhood Program Accreditation, National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)

The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Academy Early Childhood Program Accreditation sets and monitors standards for high-quality early childhood education programs and accredits programs that meet these standards. There are ten program standards, with specific criteria attached to each, which programs must meet in order to achieve NAEYC Accreditation. The framework of the standards and criteria focus on best practices in the field and the benefits to children, teachers, family and community partners, and the program administration. Additional information about NAEYC Accreditation is available at http://www.naeyc.org/academy or 800-424-2460.

Standards Used

Academy for Early Childhood Program Accreditation All Criteria Document (2015), National Association for the Education of Young Children. (NAEYC) http://www.naeyc.org/files/academy/file/AllCriteriaDocument.pdf

COA After School Accreditation (COA-AS), Council on Accreditation

The Council on Accreditation partnered with the National After School Association (NAA) to transition NAA’s accreditation system to COA. A set of standards were developed that are based on generally-accepted elements of best practice, outcomes-oriented, effective in advancing quality, and responsive to the unique needs and diversity of after school programs. Additional information about the COA After School Accreditation is available at http://coanet.org/programs/child-and-youth-development-program-accreditation/ or 212-797-3000.

Standards Used

After School and Youth Development Program Standards, Council on Accreditation. (COA-AS) http://coanet.org/standards/standards-for-child-and-youth-development-programs/

National Accreditation Commission for Early Care and Education Programs (NAC), Association for Early Learning Leaders

The Association for Early Learning Leaders (formerly the National Association of Child Care Professionals) manages the National Accreditation Commission for Early Care and Education Programs (NAC). Programs seeking NAC accreditation must follow a three-step process of self-study, validation, and review to show that they meet the accreditation standards. Additional information about NAC Accreditation is available at http://www.earlylearningleaders.org/?page=accreditation or 800-537-1118.

Standards Used

National Accreditation Commission for Early Care and Education Programs – Components of Accreditation Standards, Association for Early Learning Leaders (Formerly, the National Association of Child Care Professionals). (NAC) http://www.earlylearningleaders.org/?page=acc_processstandards

National Early Childhood Program Accreditation (NECPA)

The National Early Childhood Program Accreditation (NECPA) is a national, voluntary accreditation system for early childhood centers, schools and school-age child care programs. NECPA is primarily a self-assessment process which involves parents, staff and program management encourages all to work together to reach for a higher level of quality. The NECPA system is based upon the key indicator (statistical predictor) model and a weighted system approach. Additional information about NECPA is available at http://www.necpa.net/necpastandards.php or 855-706-3272.

Standards Used

National Early Childhood Program Accreditation (NECPA) http://www.necpa.net/necpastandards.php

National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC)

The National Association for Family Child Care (NAFCC) sponsors the only nationally recognized accreditation system designed specifically for family child care providers. NAFCC Accreditation is awarded to family child care providers who meet the eligibility requirements and are able to demonstrate competency in meeting the Quality Standards for NAFCC Accreditation. The Quality Standards for NAFCC Accreditation are based on research and best practices in the early childhood field and recognize the unique aspects of mixed ages and care provided in a home environment. Founded on the premise that relationships are a critical element in quality care, these standards reflect cultural competence and the many right ways that family child care programs demonstrate compliance. Additional information about NAFCC Accreditation is available at http://www.nafcc.org/Accreditation or 801-886-2322.

Standard Used

Quality Standards for NAFCC Accreditation, Fourth Edition With 2013 Updates (2013), National Association for Family Child Care Accreditation. (NAFCC) http://www.nafcc.org/file/35a7fee9-1ccf-4557-89d4-973daf84a052

Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI)

The Association of Christian Schools International (ACSI) is a nonprofit organization, founded in 1978 through a merger of three Christian school associations. Programs and services are designed to assist Christian schools at every grade level, including early education and higher education. The Association for Christian Schools International (ACSI) administers an accreditation program for Christian schools that provide early childhood programs. Additional information about ACSI accreditation is available at https://www.acsi.org/school-services/accreditation or 888-892-4258.

Standards Used

REACH 2.0 Standards Manual for Accreditation for EE–12 North American and International Schools—September 2015 Edition, https://www.acsi.org/Documents/School%20Improvement/Accreditation/REACH%202_0%20Standards%20Manual_01-2016.pdf